News Stories Archive - Page 4 of 11 - Facts About BPA

  • Your Plastic Water Bottle May Be Safe After All: Study

    KPCC – NBC Los Angeles

    The chemical bisphenol A (BPA), found in plastic and some metal cans, may not be as harmful as you think. A two-year study by the National Institutes of Health and the Food and Drug Administration found that even high doses of the plastic additive produced only "minimal effects" when tested on rats, NBC4 media partner KPCC reports. Scientists say those effects could occur by chance.

  • Plastic Additive BPA Not Much Of A Threat, Government Study Finds

    NPR

    The chemical BPA isn't living up to its nasty reputation. A two-year government study of rats found that even high doses of the plastic additive produced only "minimal effects," and that these effects could have occurred by chance. The finding bolsters the Food and Drug Administration's 2014 assessment that water bottles and other products containing BPA are not making people sick. "[It] supports our determination that currently authorized uses of BPA continue to be safe for consumers," said Dr. Stephen Ostroff, the FDA's deputy commissioner for foods and veterinary medicine, in a statement issued by the agency.

  • BPA unlikely to be harmful, federal study shows

    NBC News

    Bisphenol A, a chemical commonly known as BPA and once widely used in canning and plastics, is unlikely to be harmful to people in the doses usually seen, the Food and Drug Administration said Friday. The FDA said a draft report on BPA’s effects in rats offers little to worry about. “Overall, the study found ‘minimal effects’ for the BPA-dosed groups of rodents,” Dr. Stephen Ostroff, an FDA deputy commissioner, said in a statement. “Our initial review supports our determination that currently authorized uses of BPA continue to be safe for consumers,” he added.

  • Bisphenol A Has Minimal Health Effects, FDA Says

    Bloomberg BNA

    Bisphenol A, a chemical found in plastic bottles and food packaging,  has minimal adverse effects on health, according to new FDA research. Data show “few significant effects of BPA treatment” on rats in a federal study of chronic toxicity, according to a draft report released Feb. 23 by the Food and Drug Administration. Global researchers and regulators have focused on the chemical in recent years because many consumer products containing bisphenol A come into contact with food.

  • BPA – Nothing New Under the Sun?

    Science 2.0

    It’s been shown that the primary route of human exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) is through the diet.   One source of BPA in the diet is the protective coating inside many food and beverage cans, which helps to protect the safety and integrity of the product.  Epoxy resin-based coatings have been used for decades because they excel in this application.  Since epoxy resins are made from BPA, trace amounts of residual BPA can leach from the coatings into the food or beverage that we then ingest.

  • BPA Exposure In Canada – How Low Can You Go?

    Science 2.0

    recent analysis of published data on human exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) revealed more than 140 studies with over 85,000 data points from 30 countries. Taken together the data show that exposure to BPA around the world is hundreds to thousands of times below the science-based safe intake limits set by government bodies.

  • Is Anyone Safe From BPA?

    Science 2.0

    Everyone has heard about bisphenol A (BPA). It’s primarily used as a raw material to make polycarbonate plastic and epoxy resins, both of which are high performance materials used in many consumer products that help to make our lives better and safer. But that’s probably not what you’ve heard.

  • Attention Dust Bunnies: You’re Safe From BPA

    American Chemistry Council

    A common definition of the word dust refers to fine, dry particles of matter. From dust storms on earth to cosmic dust, just about everywhere that any form of matter is present, dust will also be present. That includes the ubiquitous household dust that seems to magically appear in our homes on every surface and in the form of dust bunnies under furniture.

  • Did BPA Bite the Dust?

    Science 2.0

    A common definition of the word dust refers to fine, dry particles of matter. From dust storms on earth to cosmic dust, just about everywhere that any form of matter is present, dust will also be present. That includes the ubiquitous household dust that seems to magically appear in our homes on every surface and in the form of dust bunnies under furniture.

  • Removing Glyphosate from Our Food Won’t Make Us Safer (A BPA Case Study)

    Tonic

    For years, opponents of glyphosate have argued the active ingredient in the herbicide Roundup is harmful for your health. These messages, along with a 2015 decision by the International Agency of Research into Cancer (IARC) to classify the chemical as a probable carcinogen, have spurred a group of plaintiffs to file a lawsuit against Roundup's manufacturer, Monsanto, alleging the herbicide caused their cancer. At the same time, the State of California has survived a legal challenge from Monsanto, winning the right to require a warning label about glyphosate's health risks.