Wednesday, May 3, 2017
Source:
Science 2.0

It’s widely understood that a key reason why life developed on Earth is because of water.  A common definition of a habitable environment is one in which plenty of liquid water is available to sustain life.  In short, we can’t live without water.
But there’s more to it than just the presence of water.  We want our water to be clean and healthy so as to avoid risks to people and the environment from unwanted contaminants.  With that goal in mind, numerous environmental monitoring studies have been conducted that look for various contaminants in water, and generally find some at trace levels.

Wednesday, March 29, 2017
Source:
American Chemistry Council

Thanks to years of attention to bisphenol A (BPA), used primarily to make polycarbonate plastic and epoxy resins, there is now quite a bit of attention to various alternatives described generically as “BPA-Free“. Many manufacturers proudly apply a BPA-Free label to their products, even to products that never contained BPA in the first place.

Tuesday, March 28, 2017
Source:
Science 2.0

The headline almost jumps out at you – “BPA Substitute Could Cause Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes.” That alarming headline appears in an industry publication, but the same story was widely reported in the popular media, which tends to cover science only when they can create scare stories.

Wednesday, February 22, 2017
Source:
American Chemistry Council

Like most people, you probably like seafood. Not only does it taste good but seafood provides healthy amounts of protein, vitamins, minerals, and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids.  The latter is particularly important since consumption of these fatty acids is linked to reduced risk of cardiovascular disease. That’s why international health agencies recommend 1-2 servings of fish each week. What’s not to like?

Tuesday, February 21, 2017
Source:
Science 2.0

It’s not hard these days to find stories in the popular media about the presence of various chemical contaminants in our environment.  Included in this genre are stories about trace levels of chemicals in common consumer products, in the air we breathe, and in the water we drink.  Almost inevitably the stories suggest that even minor exposures are harming our health. 

Monday, January 9, 2017
Source:
American Chemistry Council

More than 10 years ago, bisphenol A (BPA) was a hot topic in Japan. But these days, not so much. The Japanese government ministries with responsibility for human health continue to monitor scientific developments on BPA in the rest of the world, but without any apparent pressure or need for regulatory action. Likewise, there’s little or no attention to BPA from Japanese consumers or in the media.
What could account for the difference between Japan and other countries where interest in BPA continues, sometimes with a very high level of intensity? Could it be that the Japanese government and people have listened to the science on BPA?

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