Monday, February 26, 2018
Source:
Food Quality News

A long-awaited study on bisphenol A (BPA) has pointed towards ‘minimal effects’ and provided support to current US regulations. The National Toxicology Program (NTP) released a pre-peer review draft report on findings of the two-year rodent study examining potential effects of BPA on health…The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) said an initial review supports its position that authorized uses of BPA in food containers and packaging continue to be safe for consumers.

Monday, February 26, 2018
Source:
The Daily Intake

Dr. Stephen Ostroff, Deputy Commissioner for Foods and Veterinary Medicine at FDA, issued a statement highlighting the fact that the draft report points towards “minimal effects” and supports FDA’s longstanding position that BPA, at current levels occurring in food is safe. A peer-review meeting is scheduled for April 26, 2018 and will be open to the public.

Monday, February 26, 2018
Source:
Independent Women’s Forum

Well, there’s yet more evidence out there that the hysteria about the chemical Bisphenol-A (more commonly called BPA) was just a bunch of hooey promoted by green activists who want BPA and many other useful and perfectly safe chemicals banned. I’ve written about BPA (here, here, and here, and for a useful fact sheet, go here) for years, trying to explain that BPA isn’t the scary thing it’s made out to be and now a two-year government study of rats has found that there’s really nothing to worry about. The study’s results are explained in an impressive 249-page report, which was a joint effort by the National Toxicology Program, the National Institutes of Health, and the Food and Drug Administration. The study’s researchers are clear: "BPA produced minimal effects" and that the effects they did see appeared to be "within the range of normal biological variation” which means they could have occurred by chance…NPR also explains that many of the studies pushed by the anti-BPA crowd don’t meet the basics of scientific standards.

Sunday, February 25, 2018
Source:
American Council on Science and Health

A February 23, 2018, statement from the Dr. Stephen Ostroff M.D., the Deputy Commissioner for Foods and Veterinary Medicine at the FDA should come as no surprise to anyone who has been reading the numerous articles we've written over the years about Biphenol-A (BPA). The American Council has been right all along - something that incompetent or dishonest environmental groups like the Environmental Working Group or the Natural Resources Defense Council, or pseudo-science Internet hucksters like Joe Mercola and Mike Adams, cannot be too happy to hear. After a thorough two-year study, the agency has released a draft report of the NTP (National Toxicology Program) Research Report on the CLARITY-BPA Core Study, which debunks the phony science and fear-mongering that has already occupied scientist for far too long.

Saturday, February 24, 2018
Source:
MSN

Bisphenol A, a chemical commonly known as BPA and once widely used in canning and plastics, is unlikely to be harmful to people in the doses usually seen, the Food and Drug Administration said Friday. The FDA said a draft report on BPA’s effects in rats offers little to worry about. “Overall, the study found ‘minimal effects’ for the BPA-dosed groups of rodents,” Dr. Stephen Ostroff, an FDA deputy commissioner, said in a statement. The report covers years of testing BPA in many different groups of rats for two years.

Saturday, February 24, 2018
Source:
KPCC – NBC Los Angeles

The chemical bisphenol A (BPA), found in plastic and some metal cans, may not be as harmful as you think. A two-year study by the National Institutes of Health and the Food and Drug Administration found that even high doses of the plastic additive produced only "minimal effects" when tested on rats, NBC4 media partner KPCC reports. Scientists say those effects could occur by chance.

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