Friday, October 5, 2018
Source:
WasteWatcher- Citizens Against Government Waste

The long-awaited final core study on Bisphenol A (BPA), a compound used to produce strong plastic products and epoxy resins, has been released.  On September 28, the National Toxicology Program (NTP) announced that the CLARITY-BPA Core Study and Primary Data from the CLARITY-BPA Grantee Studies were available.  The core study confirms what has been known for years:  BPA is safe. 

Wednesday, October 3, 2018
Source:
Food Safety News

More research has been released by the United States National Toxicology Program (NTP) as part of a landmark study on the safety of bisphenol A (BPA). The Consortium Linking Academic and Regulatory Insights on BPA Toxicity (CLARITY-BPA) program is studying a range of potential health effects from exposure to the chemical. It was initiated by NTP, the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) and the National Center for Toxicological Research (NCTR) of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to provide data for regulatory decisions. The draft CLARITY-BPA core study research report was reviewed by an external expert panel in April 2018 and the final version was released last week along with data from academic studies. A report integrating findings from the core study and grantee studies is expected in fall 2019… The American Chemistry Council (ACC) said the results support the safety of BPA. “The final report on the CLARITY Core Study strongly supports recent statements from the U.S. FDA that BPA is safe at the very low levels to which people are typically exposed. The scope and magnitude of this study are unprecedented for BPA, and the results clearly show that BPA has very little potential to cause health effects, even when people are exposed to it throughout their lives,” said Steven G. Hentges, Polycarbonate/BPA Global Group of the ACC. CLARITY-BPA has two components: A “core” guideline-compliant chronic study conducted at NCTR according to FDA Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) regulations and studies of various endpoints, by NIEHS-funded researchers at academic institutions using animals born to the same exposed pregnant rats as the core GLP study.

Tuesday, September 18, 2018
Source:
Plastics Today

It’s been a long road for the chemical bisphenol A (BPA) used in certain plastics. Scientists from all quarters—academia, the FDA and the plastics industry—have spent more than two decades studying BPA, and just when you think the definitive word on that chemical found in polycarbonate and epoxy resins has been delivered . . . it hasn’t. Remember what I said a couple of weeks ago in my blog, “The science is never settled?" 

Thursday, September 13, 2018
Source:
NPR Health News
Government scientists have presented new evidence that the plastic additive BPA isn't a health threat.
 
Low doses of the chemical given to hundreds of rats, "did not elicit clear, biologically plausible adverse effects," said K. Barry Delclos, a research pharmacologist at the Food and Drug Administration's National Center for Toxicological Research.
Wednesday, August 1, 2018
Source:
Science 2.0

For years it would not have been possible to use the word “silence” in the same sentence with BPA (bisphenol A).  The safety of BPA has been a long-running, robust controversy, in particular regarding concerns that BPA might cause health effects at exposure levels in the very low range that we as consumers might experience every day. 

Wednesday, June 27, 2018
Source:
UL Prospector Knowledge Center
Over the past 8 years, senior scientists with FDA’s National Center for Toxicological Research (NCTR) designed and conducted a study of bisphenol A (BPA), the key raw material used to make polycarbonate plastic and epoxy resins. Named the CLARITY Core Study, this multi-year, multi-million dollar scientific study on BPA safety is of unprecedented scope and magnitude.  The results of the study were recently released and have now been peer reviewed by independent experts.
 
Learn more about this study and the extensive scientific database that supports the safety of BPA.  You’ll also learn about the latest regulatory information from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and other government agencies.
 

Pages