Friday, August 2, 2019
Source:
Science 2.0

Whether you realize it or not, there’s a good chance that you are being exposed to bisphenol F (BPF). There’s even a fair chance that you are highly exposed. If so, should you be concerned and what should you do about it?

Thursday, July 25, 2019
Source:
Science 2.0

Bisphenol S (BPS) and bisphenol F (BPF) are chemicals used in the lining of aluminum-canned food and drinks (to prevent spoilage). They were rolled out as a replacement for bisphenol A (BPA), a compound targeted by activists under claims it might statistically be an "endocrine-disrupting chemical." Exhaustive studies later found overwhelming scientific evidence that was not so.

Thursday, June 6, 2019
Source:
PlasticsToday

The People’s Republic of California, regulator of all things dangerous and hazardous, has decreed that the link between coffee and cancer is “not significant.” Consequently, businesses can take down those ominous 10-x-10-inch warning signs they were forced to post under Prop 65.

Monday, December 17, 2018
Source:
Thrive Global

With controversy over its safety raging for more than a decade, you’ve almost certainly heard about bisphenol A (BPA). It’s primarily used to make polycarbonate plastic, a clear and highly shatter-resistant material. You’ll find it in an array of products ranging from your kid’s sports safety equipment to their safety glasses in science class, to the cellphone cases and electronics that seem to never leave their hands.  

Friday, October 19, 2018
Source:
Morning Consult
With controversy over its safety raging for more than a decade, you’ve almost certainly heard about bisphenol A.
 
In response to the controversy, legislative bans have been proposed over the years in Congress, state legislatures and even a few local counties. The concern stems from an allegation from some scientists who asserted that BPA could be  “hormone disrupting” at very low levels of exposure.
 
Saturday, October 6, 2018
Source:
PlasticsToday

If I told you that the final report on bisphenol A (BPA) has been issued, would you believe me?  After nearly two decades of studies from various groups attempting to prove that BPA either causes—or does not cause—problems in humans, the results released last week once again confirm that BPA is safe in the minute levels found in plastic consumer products.

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