Thursday, June 12, 2014
Source:
Forbes

And as such, it will come as a surprise to many women concerned about such risks—or at least repeatedly warned about them by the media—that bisphenol A (BPA), a ubiquitous component in cans and plastics, is not on the list, even though there is a section for “endocrine disrupting” chemicals. Instead, the study draws attention to much more potent estrogenic chemicals than BPA, such as Estradiol-17b, a component of oral contraceptives and hormone therapies, which has entered domestic wastewater—and possibly drinking water—via urination. 

Monday, April 28, 2014
Source:
Canadian Food Inspection Agency

As part of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's (CFIA) routine testing of various food products, a survey released today reported that all of the canned foods tested for Bisphenol A (BPA) were safe to consume. BPA was not detected in 98.5 per cent of canned foods analyzed in this survey. In 2011-12, the CFIA tested 403 canned samples of domestic and imported fruits, vegetables, juices, other beverages, legumes, pasta, and soups for BPA, as these products are likely packaged in cans treated with epoxy coatings. Imported samples came from 15 different countries.

Friday, April 11, 2014
Source:
Forbes

Conspiracy, incompetence, a federal agency out of control. A recent Mother Jones story by Mariah Blake indicts the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as a threat to science and public health over the way it’s conducting research into bisphenol A (BPA), the never-ending chemical scare story of the 21st century. Raise the alarm (again), stir the pot (again), marshal outrage (again).

Wednesday, March 12, 2014
Source:
Forbes

Many non-scientists are increasingly confused and dismayed by the constantly changing advice that comes from medical, nutritional and other researchers.  Some of that confusion is due to the quality of the evidence, which is dependent on a number of factors, while some is due to the very nature of science: We form hypotheses and then perform experiments to test them.  As the data accumulate and various hypotheses are rejected, we become more confident about what we think we know.

Friday, February 28, 2014
Source:
Science 2.0

In June 2013, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) answered the question “Is BPA safe?” with a simple and unambiguous answer – “Yes.”

Wednesday, February 26, 2014
Source:
NPR

Maybe BPA isn't so bad after all.

The plastic additive has been vilified by environmental advocacy groups. But the chemical had no effect on rats fed thousands of times the amount a typical person ingests, government scientists are reporting in the journal Toxicological Sciences.

The results "both support and extend the conclusion from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration that BPA is safe as currently used," says Daniel Doerge, a research chemist with the Food and Drug Administration's National Center for Toxicological Research.

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