BPA News

Read the latest about what others are saying and writing on BPA. Sources include scientists, journalists and consumer bloggers.

Thursday, February 12, 2015
Source:
Wall Street Journal
Tuesday, February 3, 2015
Source:
Science 2.0

Press Releases

News and press releases from the Polycarbonate/BPA Global Group of the American Chemistry Council.

Wednesday, February 25, 2015

The American Chemistry Council (ACC) believes that it is important to share clear, authoritative statements about BPA safety with consumers and manufacturers. In support of this objective, ACC today began a communications campaign to highlight recent conclusions from the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Since last December, EFSA and FDA, two of the most prominent science-based government bodies in the world, have clearly and unequivocally stated that BPA is safe as used in food contact materials and other consumer products. The ACC’s Polycarbonate/BPA Global Group has launched a communications and advertising campaign to share these scientific conclusions about the safety of BPA. The ads will appear in USA Today, the Wall Street Journal and on a number of consumer, news and health websites. The ads encourage consumers and manufacturers to: “Listen to the Science: Experts Say BPA is Safe,” amplifying what the scientific experts have stated.

Wednesday, January 21, 2015

“Based on a comprehensive re-evaluation of BPA exposure and toxicity, EFSA’s scientific experts concluded that ‘BPA poses no health risk to consumers of any age group (including unborn children, infants and adolescents) at current exposure levels.’ EFSA’s overall conclusion is similar to recent statements from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on the safety of BPA.

“Going beyond previous assessments, EFSA evaluated exposure to BPA not only from food, but also from a range of other potential sources. Considering all exposure sources together, EFSA concluded: ‘BPA poses no health risk to consumers because current exposure to the chemical is too low to cause harm.’ EFSA further explained: ‘To be as open and transparent as possible, EFSA thoroughly consulted and engaged with national authorities and stakeholders during this risk assessment to ensure that the widest possible range of scientific views and information were considered.’